Tag Archives: creating

In the Time it Took for you to Talk About It

About halfway through a long-winded conversation about unfounded and baseless dreams, like most other listeners, I find myself having trouble listening.  We live in a culture where it is a good thing to have big dreams, but not a good thing to have realistic plans or have attainable goals.  That’s weird, because you can do anything you plan to do.

Dreaming is a grand activity, a fantastical practice, a fantasy envisioned, and absolutely not real or tangible.  However our dreams are powerful tools.  We dream about wanting something, attaining our desires, then we talk about achieving it, how it would be!  But there is no goal, no pathway to walk directly to it and take.  We are stuck in the talking about it and that is about it.

So, in the time we listen, in the time it took for you to talk about it you could have written up a plan to go and make and create and have.  Made a step A through finished, fruition, success, completion.  I will attempt to listen though I would rather pull out pen and paper and set things in motion to help you do what you want to do, to help you become the dream master.

I am not therapist, not counselor, I am an ordained minister by request, though I feel I could charge for giving advice about planning.  But I learned it for free in books.  Just make a goals list each day and complete those goals.  I do this because it is simple: nothing happens without being planned.  I heard recently: there is no happenstance.  Imagine.  I think you should stop talking and make plans, you should do and show.  Save the tell.

Words of Motivation: You can’t do it

I was told by a career planning counselor in high school that I would never go to the University of Minnesota; I would never be accepted as a student, there was no chance, I wasn’t smart enough, impossible… Well, I went there, and now, I go there most days. You see, I used to hear it a lot: “you can’t” or “don’t try” or “you just don’t have it in you”, or some other rejection letter or email or comment or slight. I think getting that sort of motivation is great. The naysayers, the haters, they actually inspire more than anyone or anything else. Being told that you don’t have the ability makes a person want to find the ability. I was rejected 22 times before I found what I actually wanted to do, again, after doing it. This was over the span of two years. Three times out of the 22 times I made it initially to be rejected twice more. (This doesn’t include two community colleges, a degree, and seven years of endless tests, quizzes, applications, and papers.)  The last time I tried I knew it was the last time or else I try again. As they say, persistence beats out talent in time eventually. I’ll take that. Add in some sentiment about my inability to do something and it will happen sooner, guaranteed. I bet you can’t do it either. You shouldn’t event try, it’s not in you.