Tag Archives: culture

Believe and You Can Do Anything, You Can Even Become a Millionaire if You Want

Disclaimer: I am not a millionaire, nor a financial adviser. I am someone motivated by behavioral changes that create results. I would like to share my ideas with you.

I told my 15 year-old sister that if she puts $500 in a Roth IRA each month starting now, by the time she is 40 she will be a millionaire easily. I am not sure if that is true because I am bad at math. But I believe it is possible and compound interest is real. I believe that if you do something long enough, you are more persistent and you have passion, you can do anything. You can even become a millionaire. This belief system started about a year ago.

A year ago I was in debt–I still am, like most millennials, and I was trying to buy a house I could not afford, like many of my peers. My wife was losing faith in me, we argued about wanting things we could not afford, like a house. We could not find anything in our price range and we didn’t really have a price range or a plan: just buy, that was it. We were juiced or influenced by everyone around us, social media, family, and realtors. When we hit rock bottom that was the turning point. We had spent about $5k in money that wasn’t ours. We had credit cards and student loans and we needed a house. Until we realized we had bigger problems. We had debt problems. Then we stopped.

At that point I started listening to and reading Dave Ramsey, I started reading Brian Tracy, I started reading about investing and inflation, and I started working toward integrity with my partner, trying to become something and someone I thought I could never be, just better and debt free.

A year later I am trying to motivate others to do what is right for their future, for their finances. Numerous books on investing and economics and savings and I have realized that if you want freedom you must protect your finances and work towards growing your wealth your future and your family. These ideas are not new, I am not claiming to have created them, but they have drastically changed my life and my situation for the better so I feel I owe it to others to share it with them, my experience that is.

I see people in debt. I see people unable to pay their student loans and posting on social media about how they consume and use money they don’t have to buy a lifestyle they cannot afford, distracted. I see people protesting when they can fix their problems now, and help others later after they have risen out of their debt. Debt is slavery, to me.

These ideas about my sister being a millionaire by 40 have lead me here. I am about to pay off a credit card that would have been with me a lifetime. I have a plan to pay off my student loans in less than 5 years, including my wife’s. All our consumer debt is nearly gone, save for $680. We are working together as a team to make our family prosperous. It takes hard work and a plan and nothing is perfect but we have seen results in a year and I think you can change the world if you change your financial situation. Believe.

I believe my little sister will become a millionaire by the time she is 40 if she puts $500 into a Roth IRA every month until that time.

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Real Fake Lives: Only 47% of Millennials are Living within Their Means, Social Media a HUGE Factor in Modern Debt Acceptance

I find the hardest thing about being a Millennial in 2018 is realizing that you have to stop living the lie of overspending that our culture promotes to us, that most of my contemporaries are probably assisted into debt and prove it daily, apathetically through social media posts. And this my friends, is a marketing tactic to sell you that it is OK to live on credit and not be accountable for your spending.

Debt is “good” they tell you… sure, think about that debt payment you’ll have to pay for the next umpteen years.  Not so good then.  NO.  But my credit score?  If you don’t have cash don’t buy, any wise financial guru would tell you that.

Those out there spending money to take pictures of their food, those who pretend they have fun with friends they only drink with, those out there buying shit they don’t need, those buying (or worse!) leasing new vehicles, those out there promoting products and platforms for free while they wallow in future debt, oh god, there is not down vote button for this stupidity.  Someone out there is making dollars off of them, sad.

You have to truly realize where you are. Oh, I am a human with flaws?  Oh, I am just carbon like everyone else?  SO why try to act like you aren’t?  You can not afford to put another bar tab on your credit card. You cannot afford to pay gas with a credit line. You cannot go on that vacation and make all your followers jealous.  How will you eat next Tuesday? I had to eat a bean sandwich once: just beans between bread. I am down there.  Are you bean sandwich read?!  If not, keep doing you.

It’s time to realize what a person has to do.  A person has to live free by making themselves free.  Debt is not freedom, debt is a prison.  Each day you work to pay off our debts, you are in chains.  Get out of debt now!  Or just stop reading right here and go scroll social media for hours and forget about it.  It’s all good! 😉

Or: We have to make sacrifices. Get off your phone. I think I can’t live the fake lifestyles that I see anymore. I think I must stop taking in this bullshit. I think I have to become the frugal master.  I think I have to get angry about my debt in order to change my future.  One where I will be debt free and at the beach.  Everyone wants to change things for the better for everyone else but forgets they have to change themselves for the better first.  Don’t stop being philanthropic, but if you don’t have something to give you can’t give.  Think about it.

So, trailing off, I get somewhat acutely disturbed about others unawares debt, the lives they promote that are so costly they couldn’t possibly know. But I don’t care. I realize if most are OK on a sinking ship–which is going very down fast, more lifeboats and options for me. (I am under the philosophy: I better me, I better you.)

Now think, my first sentence was very hard to take, but if you made a penny for every Tweet or Facebook post or Insta scroll, damn, you’d be loaded, and halfway through paying off that credit card or that new phone or that student debt. Now, it’s a bit easier to understand, I hope.  That is why Facebook is rich and you aren’t. Head in outer space floating for likes and affirmation of importance.  You intelligent piece of carbon. Do you have a status update for that?

Inventing Ireland: Glendalough

What I learned in College (Fall Semester 2014)

SONY DSC

Day One of Winter Break, I look back and think on this past semester. Fall 2014 was nothing short of interesting, trying, and above all, eye opening/mind expanding (whatever cliché). There was copious reading and unfollowed syllabi. One comes into contact with fliers on the walls of buildings; peers, scholars, and professors. A person can see groups talking in the mall in the sun one moment, and then weeks later, few huddled bipedals running bundled for warmth on sidewalks, and into halls. Minneapolis is as diverse in weather as it is in people.

The classes were four in number, and somewhat different; each offering a unique perspective on relevant, and mostly interesting topics- though Hamlet is still ubiquitous and rampant at the U of M campus (I am not sure if this is good or bad). I took part in a Science Fiction course which focused on social critique, a Film course which focused on gender, a non-linear Deutsch course which focused on focusing on the syllabus, tentatively, and acting, and talking, and projects which come with that, and of course tangents. I found solace in reading, in its entirety, Moby-Dick. This American Literature 1 course was enduring, yet all the same rewarding. And again, this entire experience did not come without the most important part, the people one connects with.

University is great for connecting with people. I came into contact with real-life actors, monomaniacal professors obsessed with Melville, and their TAs who wear low-cut shirts and gave smiles over discussions of hangovers. I met a professor named Craig who was the most loving, and caring woman; more open and honest than the average person outside of their homes. Moreover, I had a professor who gave me 65 percent on a paper, a fucking D, the first since high school, and it was deservedly. Examples of people I connected with, there were a million: AV a boy who carried his works in a backgammon case, Theresa who was a non-traditional student and would tell you that fact numerous times, but was as youthful as anyone my age, K, B, and D and everyone in German (H,H,…) anyone I forgot; all of these people were special and amazing and scholars in their own right. We took something from one another; student from teacher, teacher from student; student from student, etc.

These people appreciated like wine; ever getting better, and more seasoned. I can see vividly the situation where a human being is that, a human being. At 8 am in the morning we are all the same; we crawl from the warm womb of our beds to look into the mirror and judge ourselves, as we hope others won’t. We all have to get outside today, things to do. Whenever a project, assignment, quiz, or test came up, as a thorough student, I realized that the person on the other end was actually a person indeed. Writing in small letters would make it more difficult to grade, same as showing late would fuck up the flow of the lecture. I learned that that person had shit days, and had good days too. I was shown that no one is perfect, or always on time, or always smiling every second of the day. College enlightens humanity by showing examples of humanity. My experience was more personal than a letter grade.

What college has done for me so far is opened my eyes to new and unknown concepts. Even if I am reading and writing on subjects which have been read and written on a millions times over, I am doing something unknown and new. No moment is exactly the same as the moment before, even with all of the same parts involved. These parts are the people. I met people of interest, people from different and varying backgrounds; those people who took the challenge of academia as I did. We became parts of this semester, of this time, of this progressive movement called education, this system of grades and titles, and hellos and handshakes.

I think back to sitting in Walter Library every Monday at around noon talking to a friend. I would eat Cheerios out of a repurposed Talenti jar. We would discuss language, relationships, and the week ahead. We met once a week, it almost reminded me of seeing a therapist, this real-life person, with real-life opinions, sharing an honest and open real-life discussion over the things, any, which came to mind. There was no agenda, there never has been. That’s life. We walk guided by invisible strings. I sat and munched Cheerios and smiled and tried to focus on the person directly in front of me. Even the ceiling and walls offered a story. I would say, see you next week, and without text, without call, without social media, no convolution, it was so, like clockwork.

Now, looking back, I see a tinge more clearly of everyday life. The mind is a camera which captures and records. After each semester at the University I take something away, and I have left a bit heavy-hearted, and less and more of myself. I wonder: would I see these people again? Would I ever sit in the same spot with the same group with the same ideas with the same professor, words, ideology, and mindset? No. I do not think so. But now I can look back and take with me what I’ve gained. What I have gained is experienced learned. What I have learned is that we must all learn from those around us, and teach others as if they are learning too.

Naughty Kids Get the Krampus: Krampuslauf Graz 2010

Deep Contrast; Scorpio Rising

ON: Amid Rising College Costs, A Defense Of The Liberal Arts

NPR: Amid Rising College Costs, A Defense Of The Liberal Arts
“Wesleyan University President Michael Roth argues that a liberal arts education is more important than ever.”

Liberal Arts education is necessary in 2014, as it has been, especially in a world with ubiquitous problematic language; the modern episteme and such.

The study of fine arts and language is the key to history, society, and culture.  If we lack these we lose our fundamental difference from mere animals.  If you have an English Language major in the room you can better decipher written text, legal documentation, and law; you can make the ambivalent understandable.

People don’t see this though…  They see math and science as poignant, in the forefront and irreplaceable, which they are, and respectively offer immensely to the greater good, but what’s the worth if a specialist cannot convey a new invention, or breakthrough, and its meaning?

We use language everyday, but what do we really say?