Tag Archives: Education

MPR News Article appears to Explain away a Democrat’s offense as Non-Issue taken out of Context, Not so for Trump or Republicans

ST PAUL, MN–MPR News has pointed out that a video shared by Trump was edited and out of context, when a Democrat said something potentially offensive: “…some people did something,” while referring to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on America.

Acknowledging the above text, and understanding that the MPR article appears to explain the offense away as “edited” and “out of context”, one question comes to mind: How often is an offensive quote from Trump or a Republican, said during a speech or quoted from a larger text, given the same treatment by MPR or mainstream media in general?

Excerpt from MPR article critical of taking words out of full quotes and context when related to a Democrat:

How come the media doesn’t explain why Trump’s offenses aren’t offensive in an article using full quote and the full context of his comments? There are no protests on that irony. Bias maybe?

You will not find Trump’s full speech or the exact context of his comments in this MPR News article, nor will you find an excuse for his offenses, nor will you find even that consideration.

Trump’s quote simply may be edited out of context, but that is not mentioned, we don’t know for certain… There is no “edited” in the headline of their article based on a singular Trump quote:

The way it seems, is if you are a Democrat, a liberal progressive, or left-leaning individual or entity, to the news media, you may be infallible and worth explaining or condoning or making an excuse for or getting a pass, or worthy of being treated fairly. Anything else and you don’t get it. Where is the objectivity in journalism today?

Words of Motivation: You can’t do it

I was told by a career planning counselor in high school that I would never go to the University of Minnesota; I would never be accepted as a student, there was no chance, I wasn’t smart enough, impossible… Well, I went there, and now, I go there most days. You see, I used to hear it a lot: “you can’t” or “don’t try” or “you just don’t have it in you”, or some other rejection letter or email or comment or slight. I think getting that sort of motivation is great. The naysayers, the haters, they actually inspire more than anyone or anything else. Being told that you don’t have the ability makes a person want to find the ability. I was rejected 22 times before I found what I actually wanted to do, again, after doing it. This was over the span of two years. Three times out of the 22 times I made it initially to be rejected twice more. (This doesn’t include two community colleges, a degree, and seven years of endless tests, quizzes, applications, and papers.)  The last time I tried I knew it was the last time or else I try again. As they say, persistence beats out talent in time eventually. I’ll take that. Add in some sentiment about my inability to do something and it will happen sooner, guaranteed. I bet you can’t do it either. You shouldn’t event try, it’s not in you.

Life After Class – Episode I – Learn Something and Get Out!

Think and Save; How to Never Buy Textbooks Again.

Obviously this getting textbooks at the library thing isn’t some sort of secret raved-about genius way to save money on required course texts, but in some ways it is.

Let me express my sheer love for getting textbooks and other resources, digital and print, through the library systems briefly, so you can think about how you might do the same—and save money, save time, and save face.

When I started out as a CLA transfer student at the University of Minnesota, I had no idea how the library worked. I didn’t understand the importance of this resource—I had an idea, but it was vague, and that’s an understatement.

After being a student lead worker at St. Paul campus university libraries for 2 years, I have come to realize and utilize the advantages of the libraries (their branches), and the incentives that their lending service affords.

Perhaps you think: I can’t find a title, I won’t be able to get the required course materials, or I searched and that edition or exact title is not available.

Sure, you did one really impressive search (by your standards)… Well, try again. Remember: If you think you can, I know you will.

Maybe the library search engine you were perusing didn’t have it on the first try, or the first page; however, other catalogs may possess what you wish to attain.

Have your first try here: www.lib.umn.edu

A first try is good if you like not getting useful results, though a first try is a good start to something great…

So, try again.

Are you going to give up after one try and spend your hard-borrowed student loan money on things you don’t really care about/need, or are you going to search for 5 more minutes and find what you want for free?

It’s really all about your level of persistence, your level of creativity, and what you will do to attain what you desire: how bad do you want to be frugal and save? Use that thing inside your head, be like a thoughtful individual.

This year my level of wanting to save and be thrifty was high, so I found all of my books through inter-library loans, or other services provided by the library, and it took less than 10 minutes. This process took less time than it takes to send an email, or scroll through Instagram.

Last year my level was not so high. Last year I spent all sorts of what would have been beer or fun money on overpriced books which I did not read, and then at the end of the semester I sold them back at less than half price. I was lazy anyway. But, what a fucking racket. To my utter disdain I regret the decision to buy at the campus bookstore.

Mid-semester I did a quick search and found most of my textbooks here:
http://uborrow.relaisd2d.com/login.html

U Borrow is my favorite resource for any book, always. You can get new books, old books, rare books, from some great universities throughout the United States. The best part is they get delivered to whichever library you choose to pick them up at.

Everyone talks about half.com, or amazon.com, or other places where a student can buy books online and “save”. Sure… How about “save” by not purchasing top-dollar subpar products from places that drastically mark-up their selling price?

In most cases, a specific new edition book is no better than the old edition that you can obtain at a local used bookstore… Same author, same words, different year of printing and edited by different people, wow.

The new edition just has the backing of new people getting paid for rights—each year for a few extra words, for their titles and their names to adorn these improved editions. And this costs you more money, but you want to pay for it, right??? No.

Likewise, these publications and institutions are paying bucks for agency, authority, and placement, big names at pinnacle levels have their materials located in expensive bookstores.

The best, and easiest, marketing they do is by putting their product on your required texts next to your class schedule on the university website, the campus bookstore wouldn’t stock them otherwise—wouldn’t pull an immense profit off of their student body.

Each name of the editor, or publisher, or corporation (and their ideology, and what they sanction) within that book, you pay for. Your teacher, the bookstore, and the school, perhaps makes a commission on these required texts.

Think about it: Do they want you to get the newest edition of Shakespeare because it is of far superior quality, or because certain entities belong to an institution which pays for a mention, for cheap product at increased prices?

Obviate this silly scheme by getting all, or a majority of your materials through the library system. You already pay for it in student fees, and you may have the access you need at your fingertips.

When you buy from the bookstore you are paying for that bookstore’s existence: utilities, workers, facilities; moreover you pay for the interest of your professor and the university, in what they make from these institutions and agencies, from their publications, for their specific interests: profit.

Okay, breathe…

Now say you want to actually own the book, great. Great, you are an outlier on the verge of pariah! So what?

Get it at the library first—give it a try, and if you really enjoy what you’ve read—or you need it for personal use, then buy it.

I personally wouldn’t buy a car without test driving the vehicle first (or having someone else I trust test try it for me). So, why would you buy a textbook without assessing the quality first?

College is no longer affordable, any scholar with an inkling of responsibility will do anything to save money. One of those anythings is avoid the bookstore and utilize a service which is offered with no additional cost. Do it! Save yourself time and money in lines and in overpriced materials.

I’ll be honest, I’m partial to this concept because I work at a library. I love it. I am also partial because I enjoy saving money when necessary/possible. I’m smart.

I knew I needed a change when I bought the latest addition of Moby-Dick (Norton Edition, No. 9) at an incredible price ($23.00 +-), because the teacher expressed how we all needed it.

I thought on that for a moment: how much could they possibly alter or make critical improvements on this American classic? WTF?! Melville was rolling in his grave. I was completely baffled… Just think about that. I paid, and truly I paid.

I will leave you with this, the next time you think you need to get a book at the bookstore, count it out. Scratch that idea… Give it up and try something different, try a new search, give it one more minute on the browser—you can do anything. I believe in you.

Truly, get your books through a public or university library system, they are priceless and don’t carry a heavy price.

The Fear of Writing – Derrida

How to Not Tell Lies: Puff In The Land Of Living Lies

When I was little, my mother introduced me to the importance of Puff the Magic Dragon, and the what-now-seem-s0-obvious lessons he spoke about.  I will never forget what I learned from this animated series, and the narrator of it all, Puff the Magic Dragon.  Learn how to not tell lies in this wonderful children’s classic.  Enjoy.

“The Birth of a Bee: 【希望のミツバチ】働きバチの誕生(”

Visually appealing with a spine-tingling overtone which will hold you to the end.
I appreciate the art of bees, I hope you do as well. Enjoy_