Tag Archives: Programs

Saint Paul to Give $3M to Newborns based on a Study of Less than .5% the Population of the City

Melvin’s Money, by TSN_

Saint Paul, MN–Over the next three years the city of Saint Paul will give $3 million dollars (in $50 allotments) of taxpayer money to newborns in hopes that savings accounts generate college degrees. Giving out money to make progress based on cherry-picked data, that seems legit, and Democratic.

That said, this program is noble, honorable, fantastic, and based on very limited data. CollegeBound Saint Paul, the program in question, appears to rely solely on a singular data set of 1,554 participants from a 2013 study done by the Center For Development Research at Washington University.

MPR recently highlighted CollegeBound Saint Paul in an article titled, “Welcome to the world, and here’s 50 bucks for college“. In light of the limited data and the funding involved, this program should be called TaxpayerBound Saint Paul, to emphasize where the financial gift is coming from: citizens’ pocketbooks.

To clarify, the population of St Paul is 304,442 in 2016; the number of participants in the Center for Social Development’s study was 1,554 in 2013. That means the results of this study make up less than .5% of the population of the very city where this program is being implemented.

For compassion sake, to give children a fighting chance at getting an education is an honorable goal, a very progressive idea, especially done right with much research, scientific method, and proof of positive outcomes. However, to create programs funded with taxpayer dollars on scant information is reckless and poorly thought out.

I will end with this, as with any economic idea, time will tell. The truth will show itself as the aid gives way to the unrealistic promises in expensive programs. Economic ideas that work thrive over time. Economic ideas that do not work go bust, just after the politician that created them leaves office, most likely in 18 to 20 years down the line when we have no recollection of these programs or their champions or their intent in the first place.

Minnesota bars and restaurants to manually disable cellphone reception in order to counteract the lack of general interest in society

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Monday, September 15th. In a surprise move the MBARA has decided to run a test trial of a new, clandestine program that will limit, and otherwise completely restrict cellphone reception in all Minneapolis bars and restaurants. Starting this week, and throughout the upcoming weekend, locals with “important phone calls” to make, “email checks ” to have, and “status updates” posts, will be completely out of range within their favorite establishments.

The MBARA (Minnesota Bar and Restaurant Association, similar to MMBA) has decided, like their sister sect, to limit the use of cellphone service in local businesses; while limiting the freedoms of American citizens by outdated law, akin to Sunday Sales Restrictions. This trail comes on the heels of public outcry over lack of attention in those dining rooms of your proxy. “People just don’t seem to care about those around them anymore.” says an unreliable stranger. Recently, establishments have cited a lack of conversation at the table due to excessive “selfies”, “updates”, and in general “scrolling”, of social media hotbeds by patrons in attendance.

This decision to act by law has been in the process for some time; initially, when pay phones inhibited restaurant goers of meaningful conversation, duels, and wagon races, back in the 1700’s. The lack of conversation, viz-a-viz, has been a growing epidemic of recent, brought on by smartphones, tablets, and the vanity crisis facing the human race, specifically Americans.

The MBARA is staunch in their stance against people’s freedoms when it comes to being shut-off in a social setting, and liquor sales. With this law they have one objective, that being: all people within a restaurant- or otherwise social, setting, should engage with those in their presence, or have no option to do such activity at all. “Human contact and communication is of the utmost importance; it conveys ideas, histories, and cultures.” says Barb Toto. The increase in personal smart devices has rendered a society of able bodied individuals irrelevant in the age of technology, undermining its tact and thought process at the most basic level.

Minnesota Legislators have agreed with restricting citizen’s rights in the past, with Sunday Sales Restrictions in Minnesota, proper. Now is the time again. If this test trial goes well, prepare to shut-off and be in a “dead zone”, everywhere, whenever you enter your favorite bar and restaurant, it is high time we all brush up on our in-person social skills. The MBARA wants people conversing and laughing aloud in bars and restaurants, not just on social media, and that should be the law.